Take action against contract cheating

Students in meeting room

With COVID-19 impacting the way we study, contract cheating services are ramping up their efforts to target students studying online.

So the International Day of Action Against Contract Cheating on October 21 is a good reminder that cheating can put you and your degree at risk.

What is contract cheating?

Charles Sturt’s Academic Integrity subject is compulsory for all students, and details the risks and consequences of contract cheating.   

Put simply, contract cheating is paying someone else to do an assessment for you and passing it off as your own.

It’s pretty risky: not only can you be penalised for academic misconduct, but some services use blackmail to get more income.

The “essay mills” can threaten to dob you into the university, demand money, and use your personal information.

How can I find out more?

Our Academic Integrity subject is available via Interact2, and should only take 2.5 hours to complete.

It covers the uni’s policy on cheating, collusion and plagiarism, the consequences, and the services there to support you.

All you need to do is complete five short quizzes, and score at least 80% on each to complete the subject.

Be original!

If you’ve left your assessments to the last minute, you might be tempted by the essay cheating sites that pop up on Google. But always remember: your lecturers are there to help, and you can also chat to an Academic Skills advisor.

Plus the library gives you free access to 100 journal databases to help you complete your assessments.

Complete your Academic Integrity subject here